Colonial Newel Posts

First let me define a newel post for those of you that are not familiar with the terminology. A newel post is the oversized spindle at the end of most handrails. You can see it in the picture.

 

There is one newel post at the bottom of the steps in front of the entry door and another at the top of the stairs where the railing turns from coming up hill to go 90 degrees on the horizontal …. to guard the hole into the basement. This is the norm. Newel posts are used typically at every corner in a railing.

 

It is the newel post’s job to give strength and stability to every handrail, thus it becomes critically important that it gets installed correctly and security or the railing will not be able to function as a “safety guard”.

Colonial Newel Posts:  3″ * 3″  or  3 1/2″ * 3 1/2″ square

Newel posts made out of hardwoods, typically oak or maple must be a minimum of 3″ square to meet the Ontario Building Code. We have available on special order typically 3″ x 3″ and 3.5″ x 3.5″ Newels.

 

Posts are typically  48″ long and this will serve MOST applications and in fact leave you with 5-6″ on the bottom of the square, to drop BELOW the floor for attachment to the joist below. Installation method DOES change the length requirements for the posts, so answer that question first. (note: that colonial newels are also available in a 55″ length model if needed)

In some installation methods the extra 5-6″ is cut off and custom hardware is used for installation. Note that  installing the newel post securely is THE challenge of any handrail installation.

Where a post is going to be dropped to the floor at the last step (see picture above, of the newel post in front of door at the lower level) you will probably need a longer version of the same post.

 

Wood Species Available: Red Oak & Maple

Colonial Half Newel Post:

These half posts are identical to the standard newels above but have been cut in half for wall mounting and are typically only 42″ tall.

 

You can attach your handrail directly to the wall with no half newel, but a half post makes the installation more secure, stronger and easier.

 

Installation: You can screw through the back of a half post and into the handrail, as a blind method of attachment. Then use construction adhesive to glue the half post to the wall. Reinforce this installation with a few long screws (just under the handrail, and close to the floor) into the studding behind the drywall.  It’ll never move!

Wood Species Available: Red Oak & Maple

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